Nature s Metropolis Chicago and the Great West

Nature s Metropolis  Chicago and the Great West
Available:
Author: William Cronon
Pages: 592
ISBN: 9780393072457
Release: 2009-11-02
Editor: W. W. Norton & Company

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

A Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and Winner of the Bancroft Prize. "No one has written a better book about a city…Nature's Metropolis is elegant testimony to the proposition that economic, urban, environmental, and business history can be as graceful, powerful, and fascinating as a novel." —Kenneth T. Jackson, Boston Globe

Nature s Metropolis Chicago and the Great West

Nature s Metropolis  Chicago and the Great West
Available:
Author: William Cronon
Pages: 530
ISBN: 9780393308730
Release: 1992-05-17
Editor: W. W. Norton & Company

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Argues that the American frontier and city developed together by focusing on Chicago and tracing its roots from Native American habitation to its transformation by white settlement and development

Changes in the Land

Changes in the Land
Available:
Author: William Cronon
Pages: 288
ISBN: 9781429928281
Release: 2011-04-01
Editor: Hill and Wang

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Winner of the Francis Parkman Prize Changes in the Land offers an original and persuasive interpretation of the changing circumstances in New England's plant and animal communities that occurred with the shift from Indian to European dominance. With the tools of both historian and ecologist, Cronon constructs an interdisciplinary analysis of how the land and the people influenced one another, and how that complex web of relationships shaped New England's communities.

Capitalism

Capitalism
Available:
Author: Jürgen Kocka
Pages: 208
ISBN: 9780691178226
Release: 2017-11-14
Editor: Princeton University Press

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

What Does Capitalism Mean? The Emergence of a Controversial Concept -- Three Classics : Marx, Weber, and Schumpeter -- Other Voices and a Working Definition -- Merchant Capitalism. China and Arabia -- Europe : Dynamic Latecomer -- Interim Findings around 1500 -- Expansion. Business and Violence : Colonialism and World Trade -- Joint-Stock Company and Finance Capitalism -- Plantation Economy and Slavery -- Agrarian Capitalism, Mining, and Proto-Industrialization -- Capitalism, Culture, and Enlightenment : Adam Smith in Context -- The Capitalist Era. The Contours of Industrialization and Globalization since 1800 -- From Ownership to Managerial Capitalism -- Financialization -- Work in Capitalism -- Market and State -- Analysis and Critique

Capitalism A Very Short Introduction

Capitalism  A Very Short Introduction
Available:
Author: James Fulcher
Pages: 160
ISBN: 9780191039010
Release: 2015-06-25
Editor: OUP Oxford

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

What is capitalism? Is capitalism the same everywhere? Is there an alternative? The word 'capitalism' is one that is heard and used frequently, but what is capitalism really all about, and what does it mean? This Very Short Introduction addresses questions such as 'what is capital?' before discussing the history and development of capitalism through several detailed case studies, ranging from the tulipomania of 17th century Holland, the Great Depression of the 1930s, and in this new edition, the impact of the global financial crisis that started in 2007-8. James Fulcher looks at the different forms that capitalism takes in Britain, Japan, Sweden, and the United States, and explores whether capitalism has escaped the nation-state by going global. It ends by asking whether there is an alternative to capitalism, discussing socialism, communal and cooperative experiments, and the alternatives proposed by environmentalists. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.

City of Lake and Prairie

City of Lake and Prairie
Available:
Author: Kathleen A. Brosnan,William C. Barnett,Ann Durkin Keating
Pages: 416
ISBN: 9780822987727
Release: 2020-09-08
Editor: University of Pittsburgh Press

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Known as the Windy City and the Hog Butcher to the World, Chicago has earned a more apt sobriquet—City of Lake and Prairie—with this compelling, innovative, and deeply researched environmental history. Sitting at the southwestern tip of Lake Michigan, one of the largest freshwater bodies in the world, and on the eastern edge of the tallgrass prairies that fill much of the North American interior, early residents in the land that Chicago now occupies enjoyed natural advantages, economic opportunities, and global connections over centuries, from the Native Americans who first inhabited the region to the urban dwellers who built a metropolis in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. As one millennium ended and a new one began, these same features sparked a distinctive Midwestern environmentalism aimed at preserving local ecosystems. Drawing on its contributors’ interdisciplinary talents, this volume reveals a rich but often troubled landscape shaped by communities of color, workers, and activists as well as complex human relations with industry, waterways, animals, and disease.

The Fruits of Natural Advantage

The Fruits of Natural Advantage
Available:
Author: Steven Stoll
Pages: 302
ISBN: 0520920201
Release: 1998-11-01
Editor: Univ of California Press

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

The once arid valleys and isolated coastal plains of California are today the center of fruit production in the United States. Steven Stoll explains how a class of capitalist farmers made California the nation's leading producer of fruit and created the first industrial countryside in America. This brilliant portrayal of California from 1880 to 1930 traces the origins, evolution, and implications of the fruit industry while providing a window through which to view the entire history of California. Stoll shows how California growers assembled chemicals, corporations, and political influence to bring the most perishable products from the most distant state to the great urban markets of North America. But what began as a compromise between a beneficent environment and intensive cultivation ultimately became threatening to the soil and exploitative of the people who worked it. Invoking history, economics, sociology, agriculture, and environmental studies, Stoll traces the often tragic repercussions of fruit farming and shows how central this story is to the development of the industrial countryside in the twentieth century.

Nature Next Door

Nature Next Door
Available:
Author: Ellen Stroud
Pages: 192
ISBN: 9780295804453
Release: 2012-12-15
Editor: University of Washington Press

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

The once denuded northeastern United States is now a region of trees. Nature Next Door argues that the growth of cities, the construction of parks, the transformation of farming, the boom in tourism, and changes in the timber industry have together brought about a return of northeastern forests. Although historians and historical actors alike have seen urban and rural areas as distinct, they are in fact intertwined, and the dichotomies of farm and forest, agriculture and industry, and nature and culture break down when the focus is on the history of Northeastern woods. Cities, trees, mills, rivers, houses, and farms are all part of a single transformed regional landscape. In an examination of the cities and forests of the northeastern United States-with particular attention to the woods of Maine, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, and Vermont-Ellen Stroud shows how urbanization processes there fostered a period of recovery for forests, with cities not merely consumers of nature but creators as well. Interactions between city and hinterland in the twentieth century Northeast created a new wildness of metropolitan nature: a reforested landscape intricately entangled with the region's cities and towns.

Metropolitan Natures

Metropolitan Natures
Available:
Author: Stéphane Castonguay,Michèle Dagenais
Pages: 321
ISBN: 9780822977711
Release: 2011
Editor: University of Pittsburgh Press

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

One of the oldest metropolitan areas in North America, Montreal has evolved from a remote fur trading post in New France into an international center for services and technology. A city and an island located at the confluence of the Ottawa and St. Lawrence Rivers, it is uniquely situated to serve as an international port while also providing rail access to the Canadian interior. The historic capital of the Province of Canada, once Canada’s foremost metropolis, Montreal has a multifaceted cultural heritage drawn from European and North American influences. Thanks to its rich past, the city offers an ideal setting for the study of an evolving urban environment. Metropolitan Natures presents original histories of the diverse environments that constitue Montreal and it region. It explores the agricultural and industrial transformation of the metropolitan area, the interaction of city and hinterland, and the interplay of humans and nature. The fourteen chapters cover a wide range of issues, from landscape representations during the colonial era to urban encroachments on the Kahnawake Mohawk reservation on the south shore of the island, from the 1918–1920 Spanish flu epidemic and its ensuing human environmental modifications to the urban sprawl characteristic of North America during the postwar period. Situations that politicize the environment are discussed as well, including the economic and class dynamics of flood relief, highways built to facilitate recreational access for the middle class, power-generating facilities that invade pristine rural areas, and the elitist environmental hegemony of fox hunting. Additional chapters examine human attempts to control the urban environment through street planning, waterway construction, water supply, and sewerage.

Beyond the Metropolis

Beyond the Metropolis
Available:
Author: Louise Young
Pages: 307
ISBN: 9780520275201
Release: 2013-04-15
Editor: Univ of California Press

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

In Beyond the Metropolis, Louise Young looks at the emergence of urbanism in the interwar period, a global moment when the material and ideological structures that constitute “the city” took their characteristic modern shape. In Japan, as elsewhere, cities became the staging ground for wide ranging social, cultural, economic, and political transformations. The rise of social problems, the formation of a consumer marketplace, the proliferation of streetcars and streetcar suburbs, and the cascade of investments in urban development reinvented the city as both socio-spatial form and set of ideas. Young tells this story through the optic of the provincial city, examining four second-tier cities: Sapporo, Kanazawa, Niigata, and Okayama. As prefectural capitals, these cities constituted centers of their respective regions. All four grew at an enormous rate in the interwar decades, much as the metropolitan giants did. In spite of their commonalities, local conditions meant that policies of national development and the vagaries of the business cycle affected individual cities in diverse ways. As their differences reveal, there is no single master narrative of twentieth century modernization. By engaging urban culture beyond the metropolis, this study shows that Japanese modernity was not made in Tokyo and exported to the provinces, but rather co-constituted through the circulation and exchange of people and ideas throughout the country and beyond.

H N i a Metropolis in the Making

H   N   i  a Metropolis in the Making
Available:
Author: Collectif
Pages: 194
ISBN: 9782709921985
Release: 2018-11-19
Editor: IRD Éditions

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Built on 'the bend in the Red River', Hà Nội is among Southeast Asia's most ancient capitals. Over the centuries, it took shape in part from a dense substratum of villages. With the economic liberalisation of the 1980s, it encountered several obstacles to its expansion: absence of a real land market, high population densities, the government's food self-suffciency policy that limits expropriations of land and the water management constraints of this very vulnerable delta. Since the beginning of the new millennium, the change in speed brought about by the state and by property developers in the construction and urban planning of the province-capital poses the problem of integration of in situ urbanised villages, the importance of preserving a green belt around Hà Nội and the necessity of protection from flooding. The harmonious fusion of city and countryside, which has always constituted the Red River Delta's defining feature, appears to be in jeopardy. Working from a rich body of maps and field studies, this collective work reveals how this grass-roots urbanisation encounters 'top-down' urbanisation, or metropolisation. By combining a variety of disciplinary approaches on several different scales, through a study of spatial issues and social dynamics, this atlas not only enables the reader to gauge the impact of major projects on the lives of villages integrated into the city's fabric but also to re-establish the peri-urban village stratum as a fully-fledged actor in the diversity of this emerging metropolis.

The Bulldozer in the Countryside

The Bulldozer in the Countryside
Available:
Author: Adam Rome
Pages: 299
ISBN: 0521804906
Release: 2001-04-23
Editor: Cambridge University Press

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Scholarly history of efforts to reduce the environmental costs of US suburban development.

Nature s New Deal

Nature s New Deal
Available:
Author: Neil M. Maher
Pages: 316
ISBN: 9780195306019
Release: 2008
Editor: Oxford University Press on Demand

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Neil M. Maher examines the history of one of Franklin D. Roosevelt's boldest and most successful experiments, the Civilian Conservation Corps, describing it as a turning point both in national politics and in the emergence of modern environmentalism.

The Third Coast

The Third Coast
Available:
Author: Thomas L. Dyja
Pages: 544
ISBN: 9781101605486
Release: 2013-04-18
Editor: Penguin

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Winner of the Chicago Tribune‘s 2013 Heartland Prize A critically acclaimed history of Chicago at mid-century, featuring many of the incredible personalities that shaped American culture Before air travel overtook trains, nearly every coast-to-coast journey included a stop in Chicago, and this flow of people and commodities made it the crucible for American culture and innovation. In luminous prose, Chicago native Thomas Dyja re-creates the story of the city in its postwar prime and explains its profound impact on modern America—from Chess Records to Playboy, McDonald’s to the University of Chicago. Populated with an incredible cast of characters, including Mahalia Jackson, Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf, Chuck Berry, Sun Ra, Simone de Beauvoir, Nelson Algren, Gwendolyn Brooks, Studs Turkel, and Mayor Richard J. Daley, The Third Coast recalls the prominence of the Windy City in all its grandeur.

Errands Into the Metropolis

Errands Into the Metropolis
Available:
Author: Jonathan Beecher Field
Pages: 154
ISBN: 9781584658214
Release: 2009
Editor: UPNE

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

An exploration of the transatlantic character of early-American religious dissent

The Control of Nature

The Control of Nature
Available:
Author: John McPhee
Pages: 272
ISBN: 9780374708498
Release: 2011-04-01
Editor: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

While John McPhee was working on his previous book, Rising from the Plains, he happened to walk by the engineering building at the University of Wyoming, where words etched in limestone said: "Strive on--the control of Nature is won, not given." In the morning sunlight, that central phrase--"the control of nature"--seemed to sparkle with unintended ambiguity. Bilateral, symmetrical, it could with equal speed travel in opposite directions. For some years, he had been planning a book about places in the world where people have been engaged in all-out battles with nature, about (in the words of the book itself) "any struggle against natural forces--heroic or venal, rash or well advised--when human beings conscript themselves to fight against the earth, to take what is not given, to rout the destroying enemy, to surround the base of Mt. Olympus demanding and expecting the surrender of the gods." His interest had first been sparked when he went into the Atchafalaya--the largest river swamp in North America--and had learned that virtually all of its waters were metered and rationed by a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' project called Old River Control. In the natural cycles of the Mississippi's deltaic plain, the time had come for the Mississippi to change course, to shift its mouth more than a hundred miles and go down the Atchafalaya, one of its distributary branches. The United States could not afford that--for New Orleans, Baton Rouge, and all the industries that lie between would be cut off from river commerce with the rest of the nation. At a place called Old River, the Corps therefore had built a great fortress--part dam, part valve--to restrain the flow of the Atchafalaya and compel the Mississippi to stay where it is. In Iceland, in 1973, an island split open without warning and huge volumes of lava began moving in the direction of a harbor scarcely half a mile away. It was not only Iceland's premier fishing port (accounting for a large percentage of Iceland's export economy) but it was also the only harbor along the nation's southern coast. As the lava threatened to fill the harbor and wipe it out, a physicist named Thorbjorn Sigurgeirsson suggested a way to fight against the flowing red rock--initiating an all-out endeavor unique in human history. On the big island of Hawaii, one of the world's two must eruptive hot spots, people are not unmindful of the Icelandic example. McPhee went to Hawaii to talk with them and to walk beside the edges of a molten lake and incandescent rivers. Some of the more expensive real estate in Los Angeles is up against mountains that are rising and disintegrating as rapidly as any in the world. After a complex coincidence of natural events, boulders will flow out of these mountains like fish eggs, mixed with mud, sand, and smaller rocks in a cascading mass known as debris flow. Plucking up trees and cars, bursting through doors and windows, filling up houses to their eaves, debris flows threaten the lives of people living in and near Los Angeles' famous canyons. At extraordinary expense the city has built a hundred and fifty stadium-like basins in a daring effort to catch the debris. Taking us deep into these contested territories, McPhee details the strategies and tactics through which people attempt to control nature. Most striking in his vivid depiction of the main contestants: nature in complex and awesome guises, and those who would attempt to wrest control from her--stubborn, often ingenious, and always arresting characters.

War and Nature

War and Nature
Available:
Author: Jurgen Brauer
Pages: 233
ISBN: 0759112061
Release: 2009-10-15
Editor: Rowman & Littlefield

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

This book takes a comprehensive look at the environmental costs of wars around the world since the end of World War II, drawing on case studies from Vietnam, the Persian Gulf, Africa, and other regions.

The Humane Metropolis

The Humane Metropolis
Available:
Author: Rutherford H. Platt
Pages: 326
ISBN: UOM:39015066752778
Release: 2006
Editor: Unknown

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Exploring the prospects for a more humane metropolis through a series of essays and case studies that consider why and how urban places can be made greener and more amenable, this book examines topics such as urban and regional greenspaces, urban ecological restoration, social equity, and green design.

Under an Open Sky

Under an Open Sky
Available:
Author: William Cronon,George A. Miles,Jay Gitlin
Pages: 354
ISBN: 0393310639
Release: 1993
Editor: W. W. Norton & Company

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Essays examine the significance of the frontier in American history, the bases of a western identity, and the themes that connect the twentieth-century West to its more distant past

John Muir Nature Writings LOA 92

John Muir  Nature Writings  LOA  92
Available:
Author: John Muir
Pages: 928
ISBN: 9781598533422
Release: 1997-04-22
Editor: Library of America

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

In a lifetime of exploration, writing, and passionate political activism, John Muir became America's most eloquent spokesman for the mystery and majesty of the wilderness. A crucial figure in the creation of our national parks system and a far-seeing prophet of environmental awareness who founded the Sierra Club in 1892, he was also a master of natural description who evoked with unique power and intimacy the untrammeled landscapes of the American West. The Library of America's Nature Writings collects his most significant and best-loved works in a single volume, including: The Story of My Boyhood and Youth (1913), My First Summer in the Sierra (1911), The Mountains of California (1894) and Stickeen (1909). Rounding out the volume is a rich selection of essays—including "Yosemite Glaciers," "God's First Temples," "Snow-Storm on Mount Shasta," "The American Forests," and the late appeal "Save the Redwoods"—highlighting various aspects of his career: his exploration of the Grand Canyon and of what became Yosemite and Yellowstone national parks, his successful crusades to preserve the wilderness, his early walking tour to Florida, and the Alaska journey of 1879. LIBRARY OF AMERICA is an independent nonprofit cultural organization founded in 1979 to preserve our nation’s literary heritage by publishing, and keeping permanently in print, America’s best and most significant writing. The Library of America series includes more than 300 volumes to date, authoritative editions that average 1,000 pages in length, feature cloth covers, sewn bindings, and ribbon markers, and are printed on premium acid-free paper that will last for centuries.